Heidegger test

Through phenomenology to thought

William Richardson

Dear Father Richardson: It is with some hesitation that I attempt to answer the two principal questions you posed in your letter of March I, 1962. The first touches on the initial impetus that determined the way my thought would gO. l The other looks for information about the much discussed "reversal" [in my development]. I hesitate with my answers, for they are necessarily no more than indications [of much more to be said]. The lesson of long experience leads me to surmise that such indications will not be taken as directions for the road of independent reflection on the matter pointed out which each must travel for himself. [Instead they] will gain notice as though they were an opinion I had ex­ pressed, and will be propagated as such. Every effort to bring what has been thought closer to prevailing modes of (re)presen­ tation must assimilate what-is-to-be-thought to those (re)presen­ tations and thereby inevitably deform the matter. 2 This preamble is not the lament of a man misunderstood; it is rather the recognition of an almost insurmountable difficulty in making oneself understood. The first question in your letter reads: "How are we properly to understand your first experience of the Being-question in 1 [Translator's note. With regard to the translati~ of Denken, see below, p. 16, note 43. ] I [Translator's note. For the translation of VorsteUung by "(re)presentation," see below, p. 108, note 5. ] VORWORT Sehr geehrter Herr P.


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Vorwort

Heidegger Martin

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1-24
Introduction

Richardson William

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27-105
Being and time

Richardson William

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106-160
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161-193
The essence of ground

Richardson William

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194-207
What is metaphysics?

Richardson William

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211-254
On the essence of truth

Richardson William

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255-258
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259-297
Introduction to metaphysics

Richardson William

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301-308
Plato

Richardson William

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309-320
Aristotle

Richardson William

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321-330
Descartes

Richardson William

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331-360
Hegel

Richardson William

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361-382
Nietzsche

Richardson William

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383-386
Logic

Richardson William

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387-390
Humanism

Richardson William

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391-400
Transition

Richardson William

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403-417
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418-422
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423-433
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434-439
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440-472
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473-483
What is metaphysics?

Richardson William

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484-489
ΑΛΗΘΕΙΑ

Richardson William

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490-501
ΛÓΓΟΣ

Richardson William

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502-513
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514-526
The saying of Anaximander

Richardson William

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527-529
Whereunto the poet?

Richardson William

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530-552
Letter on humanism

Richardson William

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553-561
Interlude

Richardson William

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562-565
What is metaphysics?

Richardson William

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566-576
The thing

Richardson William

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577-582
Language

Richardson William

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583-587
Working, dwelling, thinking

Richardson William

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588-594
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595-620
What e-vokes thought?

Richardson William

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621-641
Conclusion

Richardson William

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